Monday, April 30, 2012

Will night never come?

"They give birth astride of a grave, the light gleams an instant, then it's night once more."

- Pozzo to Didi & Gogo on the lot of humankind, in 'Waiting for Godot' by Samuel Beckett.

8 comments:

Insignificant said...

'Was I sleeping while the others suffered? Am I sleeping now? Tomorrow, when I wake, or think I do, what shall I say of today? . . . At me too someone is looking, of me too someone is saying, He is sleeping, he knows nothing, let him sleep on.'

Samuel Beckett really is . . . something else.

I'd been meaning to comment on your soul-mates post, but I never got around to it. I think sometimes you discover your soul-mate in a person you may have known for months, or even years. Sometimes you realise right away, too. I'm beginning to believe that a soul-mate is not an entity we have to stumble upon, but one which we have to 'construct', or learn to spot. A soul is too ephemeral to be mirrored entirely in one person. Perhaps different facets of your soul are reflected in different people. I don't know if that makes much sense, but it struck me while reading your post. And I do agree with what you've written, too. Unfortunately, my perception of 'true love' and 'soul-mates' was cemented when I was about 7 years old, and saw Dil Toh Pagal Hai.

I do, I do. said...

.. and I wish to meet you! :)

Gustaf Valström said...

Did you watch this play? They produced it in my college several years ago and till date I havent the foggiest what it was all about. There are many theories of course. What did you think? I wish you wrote a post about it like the excellent one below.

Ruhani said...

And this is exactly what I meant when I said "She always manages to say something which REALLY makes me wonder about life" :)

Ramya Sriram said...

one of my fav plays.

Tangled up in blue... said...

Insignificant, I agree. Until I went and saw it, I always wondered what the big deal about this play was. why it was called the most significant play of the twentieth century. You know what I thought? Because it had these clean bare bones, because it was so spare, people were prompted to fill it with meaning most of which came from their own minds. That is why it is so successful. It is like the Rorschach test or like looking at clouds. You can see in the shapes the objects you hold in your mind. And because it tells you something about yourself.

And ah, Dil Toh Pagal Hai and Kuch Kuch Hota Hai were my first templates for love. :D And I like the idea of constructing a soul-mate for ourselves. Perhaps that is better than leaving the finding of one such to random chance. :)

Tangled up in blue... said...

I do, I do. I hope we meet, too. :) I would love to talk to you in real time! :D

Gustaf, yeah. I watched it with Ana on Sunday. I wasn't going to watch it because people said it was oblique and absurdist and all that but Ana had an extra ticket so I ended up getting really curious and going. And yeah, a lot of people were rather bewildered by it in the end. But there were those like me who could read something into it - assign certain sentences and certain actions more meanings than they originally carried. Ana thought it was a religious thing. Waiting for Godot as a waiting for a dispassionate and disinterested creator. And maybe that's a good way to look at it. There were certainly a lot of Biblical references. I thought it was more about inertia and action. About the untrustworthiness of memory. And about old friendships. Also, about the cycle of nature. Because all things repeat themselves but with differences. Of course, as I said in the other comment, you can probably read pretty much any meaning into it. Some people thought it was political - about the exploitation of man. And the subjugation of his spirit and inaction in that sense.

See, it's too muddled. I don't think I could write a proper post about it. So I simply posted my favourite line. :)

Tangled up in blue... said...

Ruhani, thank you! :) So, so much! :D

Ramya, among the few that I've watched and now read, it's certainly the most intriguing. My favourite is Antigone though. :)