Saturday, April 30, 2011

How to Save a Life

When push comes to shove and when you're up against the wall with just a chance and little else, that is when you come face to face with who and what you really and truly are.

That is when you know, for certain, whether all that humanism and kindness is just a facade necessitated by society or if that philanthropism is literal.

And those who really manage to hang on to that professed love of all humanity, within that precious last inch of life, only they understand that sometimes all one has left is their dignity. And when that is lost, life is just so many breaths and heartbeats.

Should one be allowed full control of their life, including even the way it ends? Is it valid to even consider that one can be 'offered' such a choice?

All I know is that, a lot of the time, saving someone is not as simple a matter as preserving their life.

3 comments:

Sakshi said...

Being a lawyer, I can argue with you about how right to die conflicts with the right to live.
But being a human and seeing how bad your life can be once you become an invalid.. it shudders you inside!
I dunno, what really should be the answer to the mystery that you have put up here, but I do know, what I will tell my kith and kin, if ever that situation arrives.

On the other hand, I feel the newest judgment that has been delivered by the Supreme Court of India, has in a way opened a small little window that can surely make the lives of the people suffering a little easier.

Let me know if you want read that judgment! I'll mail it to you :)

ramya sriram said...

unanswerable questions. stay tough.

Stranger in a Strange Land said...

Hello dear:

You sure picked a touch profession for a woman. I suppose you will live your words in the futurre if you already are not.

In this crazy world one must do the best one can and really upon
ones natural talents and abilities at coping with the conflict between image and reality.

If you are not so strong, then get stronger and build a strong core belief in yourself and trust in both God and your abilities. And remember you can heal in other ways than seen by your colleges.

Even in a prison cell, one can be free...it's not easy, but possible. I remember one past life in which I was so stubborn as not to deny my faith and paid a high price for this, but took that dignity and inner resolve into today and it has served me well.

Dear, I can see you ponder far too much. A balance can be reached---not easy, but can be done.

I wish you every happiness and success in your profession and personal life.

Kindest regards,
Mike
Karlstad, Sweden